what we lose when when we fear prolixity and live brevity

Nobody wants to be ‘that guy’ who goes on and on.  Besides, one-liners are cool.

So if you have a lot to say, maybe you should blog (kettle? black?)? Of course, that’s why I do – right now I’m channelling Seth Godin.

http://sethgodin.typepad.com/

Yet sometimes extreme brevity is uncool. Like:

  1. More haste, less speed.
    1. Oh boy. A work colleague sends you an email. It’s 3 words. It might be ambiguous, so at the risk of looking a bit silly, you reply asking: Did you mean x or y? they reply, tersely, in what appears to be confirmation. So you then say: So what we are saying is the blah blah is x and not y because of [reason]. You don’t need me to tell you how much longer that took.
    2. And multitasking is a myth. Every time the inbox pings, your concentration on that important thing pings away. Hey.
  2.  Some things can’t be explained in a text, or a one-line email.
    1. Like love, or systems.
    2. Or why?  why usually needs space, which, increasingly, we ‘don’t have time for’.

Call me Captain Prolixity, for reasons that you don’t have time for.

* * LONDONERS A Stud’s Terkel soundalike loved…

LONDONERS

A Stud’s Terkel soundalike – loved the first one

‘Teacher’ just been on air.

BBC say:

“Craig Taylor’s book has given new voice to Londoners; the rich and the poor, the native and the immigrant; men and women. It continues an oral tradition that goes back to Henry Mayhew’s London Labour and the London Poor, published in the mid-nineteenth century.

”Taylor gives us the squatter and the teacher; the bicycle mechanic and the registrar; the plumber and the rickshaw rider; the lost property clerk and the Wiccan priestess, who casts the remnants of her spells into the Thames.

“These remarkable snapshots of the city dwellers are moving, funny and informative.

Reviewer say:

“What makes Londoners as valuable as any sociological treatise is Taylor’s appreciation of the ways in which his subjects are themselves surveying, analysing and theorising the turbulent city in which they live…. At more than 400 pages, the book could easily have been twice as long… But this remains a remarkable volume, from the heaving, contradictory energy of its countless funny, terrifying, epic stories” Sukhdev Sandhu in The Guardian.”

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b018hhmq