Is technology killing children’s play culture, or breathing new life into it?

Hello readers,
to quote myself in the comments on this blog by T.Gill that I am reblogging, and you’ll have to read the reblogged blog to better get my drift:

“Playworkers notice [the richness, creativity and majesty of children’s culture, that goes unnoticed most of the time].

”More than anyone else who works with children, more even than mum or dad or teacher, I humbly contend.

“The good playworkers do anyway; if not all of them, the poor benighted creatures that they are, so often victims of cuts, poor training, uncaring local authorities and so on.

”And what better guides for you[Tim Gill], as you roll up your sleeves and do some voluntary worker as a playwork helper, than my lovely chums at PATH (Play Association Tower Hamlets)?

“THERE IS A HUGE GULF,
AND IT IS WIDENING,
BETWEEN WHAT IS WRITTEN ABOUT PLAYWORK
AND THE LIVED EXPERIENCE OF PLAYWORK
ON THE GROUND.

”Things aren’t improving either, in this ‘age of precarity’ or as some insist, ‘age of austerity’. Lucky are the few playworkers who have any ‘job security’, much less a pension.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Precarity

“I look forward to more of your excellent and insightful writings, Tim, especially in the field of playwork.

”Shameless plug – I’m running the ‘Ludic Salon’ for playworkers, and also two workshops, at the excellent National Playwork Conference in Eastbourne on the 4th and 5th of March, if any readers would be interested.

“One of the workshops will revisit two classic publications: ‘Best Play’ (which I believe a certain T.Gill was involved in), and ‘Making Sense – playwork in practice’.

[The other, a repeat of a groundbreaking session form last year, will look REFLECTIVE PRACTICE, through the lenses of storytelling, love, work, and play.]

http://www.playworkconferences.org.uk/

Rethinking Childhood

Just before Christmas, I was helping out at an after-school play session in a community centre in Tower Hamlets in East London. Eight-year-old Jane arrived, took a plastic mug from the kitchen, sat down at a table near me, and started clapping her hands and the table, and tapping and flipping the cup, in a repetitive, rhythmic routine.

Cup on a table in front of a boy

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